SOLID WOOD SOCK BLOCKERS ARE BACK IN STOCK!!

#6 - Lia Weitzel - Educator and friend of Ja, Wol

by Saskia de Feijter on December 03, 2020  in a smaller lifea smaller life podcastpodcastS1-E7

Badass outback chick, powerful woman, fun, friendly and charming, dedicated to caring for the earth… these are just a few ways we could describe our guest this week. Lia joins us from all the way in Australia and still manages to brighten our day, plus she’s incredibly knowledgeable! From animal cruelty in the wool industry to sustainable farming in the cotton industry, she brings a new perspective on ethical consumerism. 

Lia works on an adult literacy project and has spent some time in the outback for this project. Currently she's back in Sydney working on that same project and also works at Skein Sisters, a yarn shop she calls a sister shop to Ja, Wol. Lia would know this as she worked at Ja, Wol for a year and a half (2017-2018) so you might have met her in the shop. 
Tune in to this week’s episode. (P.S. You might want to share it with a friend.)

When you’re buying Merino wool, please remember to check if it’s cruelty free. As Lia said, you can always contact the mill by phone or email to ask if they use mulesing on their sheep!


Find 100 mulesing-free clothing brands by clicking here https://woolwithabutt.four-paws.org/brands-against-mulesing

Sign a petition to stop mulesing by visiting this website https://help.four-paws.org/en/sign-protect-lambs-mulesing


Do you know of any mulesing-free yarn brands that you can share with us? Do you have a comment for Lia or Saskia? Do you want to hear from our Down Under Reporter again? Send in a voice message to A Smaller Life for a chance to be featured on the show!

Lia at work @ Ja, Wol

 

 

With this podcast I want to take you with me on my journey to discover the answers to these questions: What do we buy, Where do we buy, Who do we buy from… Or don’t we buy at all but use what we already have? And how relevant is my job as a yarn shop owner selling people stuff when we already have more than we need? How can I make my life as an entrepreneur and textile crafter smaller and more relevant to these times?

Have a question? Want to leave a message? Click the voicemail tab on the right, or scroll down to leave a text message. I'd love to hear from you!

Find me at www.ja-wol.com and @jawolrotterdam on instagram.
This podcast is so much fun to make but it isn't free. Support the podcast via my Patreon page. You'll get all sorts of extra's, like mini behind the scenes podcasts. You can become a sponsor and get your name on the podcast and much more! 

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In order to make the podcast available to as many people as possible, here's the
transcription:

Saskia de Feijter  

Lia is my friend and ex coworker at Ja, Wol. She returned to her home country, Australia, after three years of living in the Netherlands. Working with Lia was always so much fun. She had so many good stories. Totally overqualified for the job according to the "normal" standards, but a talented yarn seller nonetheless. Dutch elderly ladies would come in and she would be so charming communicating in her freshly learned Dutch and some Australian English. Even the grumpiest gran would warm up to her quickly. I miss talking to her about our values, feminism and cultures. So I decided to give her a call. It was so much fun talking to her about the difference in our climates and what the knitting climate in Australia is like. We dove deep into needs, wants... and opossums. Here's Lia. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Hello, Lia. 


Lia Weitzl  

Hello! 


Saskia de Feijter  

Nice to have you on my podcast that's brand spanking new. Um, would you like to introduce yourself shortly, say who you are, what you're doing? How do you know me?


Lia Weitzl  

I would love to. Well, my name is Lia. I am Australian. And how do I know you? Well, I moved to the Netherlands for two years, about three years ago. And we were there because my partner was studying at TU Delft and I was looking for work and something meaningful to do with my time. And I at that point, I think I'd been knitting for around six or seven years, and I thought that maybe I would like to get more involved in the knitting scene in The Netherlands. So I contacted you, and asked you if you needed any help with anything. And we had a lovely cup of tea in the shop. And next thing, you know, we're best friends and having a lovely time working at Ja, Wol. And a little bit about myself... I, at the moment in Australia, I work for an Aboriginal organization, which focuses on teaching adult literacy. And I just spent a year working in the outback, in the middle of Australia. That's what I do by day, and by night, I like to knit all sorts of things on my couch and watch TV.


Saskia de Feijter  

So good to have you. It's so good to hear you. You feel like you're next to me on a couch. Doesn't feel like you're in Australia at all. So weird I remember, mostly of our time together, I remember you complaining about the weather.


Lia Weitzl  

[laughing] At least once every day. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Yes, at least. And what I thought was so interesting was that you love spring because you don't get spring like we do. Can you share with everybody what your spring experience in the Netherlands was like compared to where you are now in Sydney? 


Lia Weitzl  

I've not experienced a weather like I did in the Netherlands. And spring was just something that was just this, like, deep-seated sense of joy that I have never experienced from the weather before. Seeing the flowers pop up by the side of the road as you're cycling along, or like that first cycle that you take when you don't need gloves. And I can tell you like, I'm Australian and I'm so pathetic, I bought gloves for -20 for skiing and I would wear them on my bike and they weren't enough. And the first cycle you take with your gloves off, when the flowers are around you and the trees are turning green... it's just this magical thing, because we don't really have- I think they're called deciduous trees. We don't have trees that drop their leaves. Not really in Sydney at least. And that was like just truly, so beautiful. Sometimes I would just want to cry about it.


Saskia de Feijter  

You have forever changed my outlook on spring. Because now when spring comes, I'm always like, Aww Lia would love this. And I love it too. I mean, I love spring, but it's just such a different view on it. The idea that if you look at the weather in Sydney, it's for ever green and forever nice weather. And we are used to like, it could be really cold and really, really wet. Really windy. And do you think-- were you here long enough to have an idea on how that would change people? or how... Are Dutch people different because of that, you think?


Lia Weitzl  

I think that's tricky. Because when you ask me that, I sort of... I think about all the other Europeans who live in a similar climate and how cultures are quite different in each country. Yeah, but I do think that the winter definitely makes people a little bit more... I don't know what the right word is for it, like maybe impatient? Like they don't have time for being easygoing? It's just like, let's get this done. And move on.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah, yeah, yeah. 


Lia Weitzl  

Maybe? 


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah, I think definitely in Europe, when you look at people that live in the south and people that live in the north, there's definitely a general idea of the people in the north are more rigid and a little bit more strict in things and the people in the south are more laid back and taking it easy, taking their siestas, eating late at night because they can and yeah, there's definitely even within Europe a big difference between people- where they live and the climates. How are you? How are you an even a knitter in Sydney? What, let me know, what is the temperature in summer and in winter?


Lia Weitzl  

I mean, of course, Australia has hugely varied temperatures. We're such a big country, in the north of Australia, it's 30 degrees all year round. And in the south, you know, in the summer, you can still have days that are a high of 15 degrees. So we have that full range in the country. In Sydney we're very temperate. In summer, any day would range, a high, between, say, 30 and 40 degrees? Anywhere in that range.


Saskia de Feijter  

Holy shit! [laughing] Oh, you can say shit on my podcast... by the way. [chuckles]


Lia Weitzl  

Oh, perfect. [laughs] I'll keep that in mind for later. Uhm, and winter is probably like, anywhere between 15 and 20 degrees?


Saskia de Feijter  

So but what do you knit? And what kind of materials do you use? And when do you wear your knitting and and... knitting, Australia, how?


Lia Weitzl  

So I mean, I think the first thing that you have to remember is that, you know, we all climatized to the weather that we're used to. And another thing that is so important is that Australians don't have very good heating. So during winter, even though the outside temperature is not that cold, inside your house it's pretty chilly. My dad is from Canada. He's from like, the deep center of Canada, where it gets to -40 in the winter, and one year many years ago, my grandmother came to visit us from Canada, and she said she'd never been as cold as she was in that winter that she came to visit us. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Oh, wow.


Lia Weitzl  

So it's just, it's just a different kind of cold I think. So you know, I wear plenty of wool all through winter, multiple layers of it. And because I'm so pathetic with the cold, I can't deal with it as well as, say, you might. But another interesting thing that I really noticed from living in the Netherlands and living in Australia is that the temperature difference for each day is so much lighter. I remember in Rotterdam like, during winter, if the high of the day was zero, then the low of the day might have only been minus five or minus two, even, but in Australia, it's the high of the day is 15 and the low of the day could easily be five or six, right? So the evenings can get a lot cooler. So I have plenty of woollen jumpers. I wear them all, I love them. I have no problem making them all year round. But it is really nice to also be able to wear your summer knits almost all year round.


Saskia de Feijter  

So what kind of fibers would you work with in your knitting?


Lia Weitzl  

Well, my favorite fiber to knit with it's got to be wool. And it's probably my favorite fiber to wear as well, which is a little bit sad for an Australian because you know


Saskia de Feijter  

You can do with more plants fiber stuff.


Lia Weitzl  

Yes, exactly. But summer clothes definitely cottons and linens; a really nice blend of the two, maybe even some bamboo or something like that. But there are a lot of interesting challenges that you have to consider when you're choosing fibres in Australia, especially if Australian made and produced that can make it hard to find the right choice. For example, I think the general rule with shopping and trying to find an ethical wardrobe is that you should go local. But cotton, as an example of a good fiber that you would want to wear in summer - it's breathable, it's light - in Australia, this is my personal opinion, it doesn't really make sense to be growing cotton, because it's such a water-intensive plant. And we are a drought country. And I really learned a lot about it in my year living in the outback, where there was a lot of cotton farming. And in fact, the rivers had been run dry, basically, due to cotton farming in the region. There was huge economic problems and towns just basically facing economic ruin due to the drought. And it's really made me re-evaluate Australian cotton. It's like an interesting kind of, tug of war in your mind, because you want to go local, you want to support things that are happening in your region, but you also don't want to support an industry if it doesn't make sense. And that's just like one of the interesting things that I'd love to spend some time learning more about.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah, I would love to go on that journey with you! And this is what I'm doing within the podcast and also in our online community. Just going on a trip together to find the good materials and where they are made as close to you as you can get them. Is there anything you know about plant-based fibers from Australia that could be an alternative to cotton? Have you found any yet?


Lia Weitzl  

I think that some linens from Australia could work well. I understand that there are flax plant farms in sort of the south eastern parts of Australia where it is a bit more rainy, where flax, which is the plant that linen is made from, is grown quite sustainably. So I think it's all about paying a little bit more attention to exactly where your fibers come from. So not just that it's Australian made, but where in Australia? And of course, for us that's a bigger consideration than in the Netherlands. But there is another animal-based fiber that I thought I should mention, because it's a kind of fun one. And that is possum wool. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Oooee 


Lia Weitzl  

Have you ever knitted with possum wool? 


Saskia de Feijter  

No, I haven't. And could you describe what a possum looks like first? 


Lia Weitzl  

Oh, gosh. Okay, so a possum is an animal that is native to Australia. It's a little mammal. They are endangered. And I hear them at night. And they make this terrifying shrieking noise. But they, they're very cute. They're very fluffy. And they have big eyes, and they climb the trees. And sometimes if you're lucky, you'll just be walking down the street and you'll turn and see a possum just staring with its big eyes just right at you. [laughs]


Saskia de Feijter  

Aww.


Lia Weitzl  

They're quite sweet. I encourage you to Google it. 


Saskia de Feijter  

I will!


Lia Weitzl  

Do, do. Yes. And I mean, what's amazing about possum fiber is that their hairs, or their fibers, are fine and hollow. The only other animal that has hollow fibers is the polar bear.


Saskia de Feijter  

Really?


Lia Weitzl  

Yeah, so that means that possom wool is very light and it's also a great insulator. As far as I understand, it's like, maybe eight to 10% warmer and like 15% lighter than many sheep's wools?


Saskia de Feijter  

That's interesting. So my next question is, is how do you get the fiber from the animal?


Lia Weitzl  

Yes, well, there's an interesting link where Australia and New Zealand meet. So even though the possum is native to Australia, it was introduced by the British to New Zealand and it became a pest. And New Zealand is totally overridden with possums. So they have like population control program in New Zealand. So even though you can't get possum fibers from Australia, if you buy them from New Zealand, it's actually an ethical choice. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Right. 


Lia Weitzl  

And the possum furs are collected after the animals have died. So they're not farmed, and they're not killed for their fur or wool. They're killed because they're a pest.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah, yeah. nicely put. 


Lia Weitzl  

Yeah, so-- 


Saskia de Feijter  

There's so  many levels of using animal fibers for our clothing isn't there? I mean, I should invite a vegan to talk about using animal fibers and see what our different opinions of it are but for now, this really seems like an ethical way of using opossum fur? 


Lia Weitzl  

I think, given that they're a threat to native animals in New Zealand, you know, it's a trade off. But you know, on that thought, I remember one day when I was working in the shop at Ja, Wol, this whole dilemma really, it was brought to light to me in a really interesting way. I had maybe four different customers that day, and each one came in saying, "I want to make an ethical choice." The first woman she said, "I don't want any plastics, in my yarn, I want it to be all natural fibers," because the plastics go into the ocean, you know, she's she talked about all that kind of stuff. And I said, "Yeah, of course, well, these are the ones we have." And then the next woman came in a little while later, and she was like, "I don't want any animal fibers. I only want plastics, or plant based, because I'm concerned about animal cruelty." And then a little while later, the next woman came in, she said, "I only want plant based and I don't want these fibers." And you know, and I remember I had three or four women, all with the same level of concern for making an ethical choice, but each one making a different one to the one before, due to that sort of dilemma. And I just remember that really highlighting the predicament that we face. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Yes.


Lia Weitzl  

And you know, it's a lot about your personal values. And what what is important to you.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah, definitely. And also, the fact that there is so much to choose from. Like, where you have so many options, and that you can actually have specific wishes is like two energies that work against each other. Because I am trying to make my collection even smaller and even more local and more ethical than it already was. But that means that you have to let go of certain wishes, like, very soft yarn or brightly colored, I'm just saying you can have it all but and it's going to be harder to find exactly what you want, if you have these ethical wishes. And this is part of what I'm doing is trying to inform people of how much you still have to choose from, and just going into that conversation with yourself. What is luxury, what is important? So-- I sound like a New Yorker there! What's important. [both laughing] 


Alison, Editor  

It all depends on what's important to ya, that's it. That's all it is! 


Saskia de Feijter  

[both laughing] So yeah, that's very interesting. And this is absolutely what happens in the shop all the time where people have different wishes. And we always had something for everybody. But yeah, cotton is very complicated. For me, I'm focusing on the linens more now, but it's definitely something that I'm still investigating and seeing if... everybody can always send me tips, by the way. If you're listening, and you're like, "Oh, but I have this brand, I know of this brand and it's great, it does everything right," just let me know. We'll be so much better because of everybody's tips and tricks and everything. Yeah, so um, would you say... if you would not choose cotton anymore, would you say that you could do with a thinner, lighter wool? If you do like a wool, silk fingering weight type of yarn? Would that be something you could wear? Like for instance, in the middle of summer at night, you're having a barbecue and it's getting a little bit chilly... even if it's still hot, then with a fingering weight wool you'd be great, you'd be fine. But I would be very interested to know what kind of temperatures would work with a thin wool t-shirt. And I'm asking this because I know that in desert climates, you hear of people that wear woolen blankets, they put it around them at night when it's freezing, but they keep them on during the daytime when it's really hot, because wool is so isolating. So if they keep the woolen blankets or clothing on, they will protect their body from the heat. And it's very interesting, I need to dive into that a little bit more. Because for me, I still think that if it was around 30 degrees here, I would not wear wool t-shirts. I would definitely go for a linen something.


Lia Weitzl  

No, I think that's really interesting. And I would also wonder like, what are the properties of a blanket that, kind of covers you, but gives you a bit more air around your body that might be different to a top.


Saskia de Feijter  

And also what part of it is, like... it's in your head? What part of me just knows that wool is warm, and that's my experience, and so I'll never wear a wool t-shirt. Because wool is warm to me.


Lia Weitzl  

[laughing] 


Saskia de Feijter  

I guess I should just knit one and experience it because wool also breathes very easily, it has very good air regulation, it takes up 30% of it's weight in moisture, so it would actually be great for sweating!


Lia Weitzl  

[laughing]


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah! I mean, the theory says it should work.


Lia Weitzl  

I'm going to try it. A knitted summer tap.


Saskia de Feijter  

You should definitely knit a summer top and let me know how that works for you. [chuckling] 


Lia Weitzl  

In wool. I will, I'll report back. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Cool, cool. This is our reporter from Australia, reporting in her wool t-shirt. [both chuckling]


Lia Weitzl  

Worst comes to worst, I can use it as a vest in winter.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah, exactly. Layer up, layer up. So, um, when you're in Australia, where do you get your yarns from? And does your local yarn shop sell ethical yarns? Can you tell me a little bit about that?


Lia Weitzl  

Yeah, I can. So I definitely have an LYS or two in Sydney that I frequent. In fact, I have one that is, it should be the sister shop to Ja, Wol. It's very similar in vibe and personality; it's called Skein Sisters. They're really, really lovely and they have lots of ethical choices. They opened fairly recently, I think they're only a few years old. So they're really aware of all of the things that modern women are paying attention to at the moment, so that's really exciting. They have lots of local choices through them. I've been able to learn about a lot of the wool mills and spinning mills in my state, which has been really interesting to hear about. And in fact, I'm thinking that maybe once the lockdown has lifted, I'd like to go and visit a couple of them on some regional holidays.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah.


Lia Weitzl  

But yeah, there's another shop that is not as close to me which is a little more established. They have a great range as well, but probably they're less focused on ethical yarns. So we definitely have a good range. And if you go to Skein Sisters, they have an amazing mechanical skein, ball, reveler contraption, and it is the most entrancing thing, to just sit there and watch it go, so that's an added bonus.


Saskia de Feijter  

Have you ever actually visited a spinning mill?


Lia Weitzl  

I have not ever visited a spinning mill, no. Have you? 


Saskia de Feijter  

You said you wanted to do that. 


Lia Weitzl  

I do.


Saskia de Feijter  

And you should because those.. I-- it's the best thing. It's almost hypnotic when it works. It's really-- it's really... [giggling] almost kind of sexy. Because it's so... I mean, those machines, they're so... manly. [starts laughing]


Lia Weitzl  

[laughing] Oh my...


Saskia de Feijter  

[very hard laughing]


Lia Weitzl  

No, I know you mean, I know what you mean.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah. It's just-- and they are, usually, the machines are very old and they're built to last and they have lasted. And they're still making yarn! And I think that's just the most wondrous thing, I don't know. I think it's really-- I visited one on Islay, Scotland, and in other places in the UK and in France, and every time I'm like, "Ohhhhh my god," I would just sit there. Sit there and knit and hear the sounds and watch the movements and just... yeah, it's kind of mesmerizing, I don't know. Can you tell that I like machines?


Lia Weitzl  

I can tell and I appreciate it. And I'm definitely going to go and visit one and report back on that as well.


Saskia de Feijter  

Great! Great. You're gonna be our Down Under Reporter Lia.


Lia Weitzl  

That's right. that's me. 


Saskia de Feijter  

...reporting from...


Lia Weitzl  

From the outback. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah, cool. Yay. Cool. Hey, so to round this lovely talk off, maybe you should also tell the people about your biggest knitting project you finished recently.


Lia Weitzl  

Okay, so well, first of all, I just had a non wedding. And by that, I mean, my partner and I, we decided to have a celebration, but we didn't get legally married. So we just had the party part. I guess you call it a commitment ceremony, but I call it a wedding because that's kind of just what it was. And it had lots of recognizable features from a wedding like a ceremony and a bride and a groom and flower kids. And my sister and I both went a little bit crazy on the crafting front. For us, half the reason you have a wedding is because you can craft. Yeah, I mean, isn't that the case for everybody? Surely. 


Saskia de Feijter  

[laughing]


Lia Weitzl  

And my sister and I are really perfect crafters for each other because she is an excellent seamstress. And I definitely focus on the knitting or needle work variety of crafting, and we really had our powers combined and it was probably our biggest crafting effort yet. What I did for my part was I knitted the outfits for our flower kids. We had three little girls and one little boy and I knitted the Snowberry dress by Knitting for Olive, and I made it in an Australian cotton. So there you go, I chose the cotton for that project. And oh my god, they were so cute. Shit! They were just so cute. It worked out really well. And, you know, it was actually a huge project. By the time I was casting on the third dress, I was thinking like, "Why? Why did I choose this?" I was going a little bit spare but it was all worth it in the end. And I was in a little bit of a rush, you know. I started off slow and just enjoying myself, [singsong] "Oh, this is gonna be so great," and as the wedding day crept closer and closer, I started to panic a little bit and think like, "I don't think I'm gonna finish this in time." I started to calculate how many rows I would need to do per day to get finished a week before the wedding. But then I kept being really busy and not getting my row quota finished, and having to up my row quota every few days, recalculating, panicking. And by the end, I think I... I was knitting right up until the day of the wedding. I was weaving in the ends of the final one while I was getting my hair done, on the day-


Saskia de Feijter  

Ohhhhh, 


Lia Weitzl  

and in the week before the wedding, I think I was knitting 22 rows a day.


Saskia de Feijter  

Holy Mother.


Lia Weitzl  

Yeah. Oh, it was worth it. It was great.


Saskia de Feijter  

There was one last question that I thought of just now. It's kind of a tricky one because Australia here is known for not treating Merino sheep that well. So they really get a bad reputation for doing mulesing, which is, uh... een ingreep... like,


Lia Weitzl  

I can explain it if you like. 


Saskia de Feijter  

Yeah! Yeah. 


Lia Weitzl  

So mulesing is, it's used to protect sheep against flystrike, which is a pretty hideous issue where flies breed in the woolly wrinkly skin behind a sheep's bum. And flystrike is particularly terrible in Australia. And mulesing is where they remove that skin, so that it just doesn't exist anymore and there's nowhere for the flies to to breed. The problem with it is that should be a surgical procedure, basically, with anesthetic. And, you know, if done properly, it's quite a serious procedure. But historically, and currently, in Australia, it's not done in a caring or humane way. It's just done with no anesthetic en masse and it can be really horrible. So I think that in Australia, because flystrike is such a problem, farmers have been slower in finding other ways to deal with it. But there are lots of other ways, so there's no excuse really for doing it anymore. Some of the other ways of dealing with it are like breeding programs where they can choose to breed the shape with less wrinkly woolly skin behind their bums. And there's also non surgical treatments and ointments and things that they can use--


Saskia de Feijter  

Oh I could say so many fun things now, but I'm not gonna.


Lia Weitzl  

[laughing] So you know, I think that the important thing to do is to research if you're buying Australian Merino. This is something I've done, is you can call the mill where their spun and ask them. Because there's many thousands of farms around Australia who do things ethically, so it's very doable to find good quality, ethically sourced Merino yarn.


Saskia de Feijter  

Absolutely. And yeah, send them an email, give them a call, because they need to know that we, as a consumer, are interested in buying the good stuff. 


Lia Weitzl  

Yeah, absolutely. And it's my understanding that about a quarter of the wool on the global market comes from Australia. We have a huge wool industry. We have something like 75 million sheep, which is more than triple our human population.


Saskia de Feijter  

Oh my god, that's like the amount of bikes we have in Holland. Bike to human ratio.


Lia Weitzl  

Exactly. Except we don't ride the sheep.


Saskia de Feijter  

[laughing] We don't shave our bikes, either. 


Lia Weitzl  

[laughing] That's true.


Saskia de Feijter  

Leah, thank you so much for talking to me today and being so helpful and giving us so much information about knitting ethically in Australia. And I'd love to have you back reporting on your adventures with opposum yarn and the spinning wheels. [intro music fades in]


Lia Weitzl  

Thank you and thank you for having me. I had a lot of fun and yes, I will be your Outback Reporter on all things light wool and short sleeve tops and yes, opossums.


Saskia de Feijter  

Yay. Thank you, bye! 


Lia Weitzl  

Thank you. 


Saskia de Feijter  

I loved this conversation so much. I hope Lia wants to take me up on that question to be the podcast's Australian reporter, that would be so much fun. Drop me a line if you would like to hear more from her and knitting in Australia. Until then, buy less, buy better, get skilled and make it last.


Transcribed by https://otter.ai


AND ALISON MAGLAUGHLIN!


1 comment
by Emma Williams on March 24, 2021

Just listened to this fascinating episode and I loved it! As a fellow Aussie living in NL I have also had to adapt to Dutch weather, which isn’t all bad because it gives me an excuse to wear lots of fun knits most of the year! One of my jumpers is made from NZ possum wool and it’s sooo soft and warm and cozy, and another is a mustard turtle-neck jumper made by the brilliant Lia from Ja, Wol wool 🤩 I’m a huge fan! Great to learn more about the ethical productions of different fibres and I’ll be sure to keep everything you talked about in mind next time I do a wool order for my next projects. Thanks and looking forward to listening to more episodes while I knit 🥰


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